Core Course - Humanities

AP/HUMA 2325 6.0A - INTRODUCTION TO U.S. STUDIES

Through the study and evaluation of primary texts (including essays, newspapers, books, political and legal documents, films, music, and the visual arts) students consider how individuals living in the U.S. have over the course of time perceived, articulated, celebrated, criticized or lamented their condition. The course addresses a variety of themes and controversies (the frontier, slavery and its legacies, republican government and constitutional law, regionalism, religion, immigration, popular and consumer culture, the U.S. in the world) in order better to comprehend the historical and mythic forces that have shaped and defined American life.

This course is a requirement for students in U.S. Studies and provides them with a foundation for the subsequent courses they take in this program. It introduces a broad range of disciplines including literary studies, history, political science, and the arts.  It also provides a chronological overview of the development of the United States from its colonial origins to the present day.

Other students, who are not majors, will similarly benefit from the coherent, but wide-ranging approach that characterizes the course.

ASSIGNMENTS:
Mid-Year Exam (20%); Final Exam (20%); Evaluative Essay (15%); Research Essay (30%); Participation (15%).

REPRESENTATIVE READINGS:
David A Hollinger and Charles Capper, Eds. The American Intellectual Tradition Volume I: 1630-1865. 6th Edition. New York: Oxford UP, 2010. The American Intellectual Tradition Volume II: 1865 to the Present. 6th Edition. New York: Oxford UP, 2010. Morrison, Toni. Song of Solomon. 1977. Twain, Mark. Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. 1884.

COURSE DIRECTORS: W. Gleberzon

RESERVED SPACES: Some spaces reserved for Humanities Majors and Minors.