Course Descriptions

Program Courses (categorized by time period)

1. Literature

Before 1900

AP/EN 2230 6.00 Introduction to American Literature
This course provides a broad but selective overview of American literature from the European encounter to the present. It introduces students to the major concepts, issues, contexts, events, and writers necessary for future study in the field.

AP/EN 2231 6.00 African American Literature
An introduction to the African American literary tradition across genres, from its slavery-era origins until today, exploring representations of selfhood, consciousness, solidarity, conflict, power, literacy, voice, heritage, and destiny.

AP/EN 3310 6.00 Poetry of the United States
A critical examination of the major achievements of American poets writing in the 20th century against the background of earlier poets who may be said to have established the foundations of an American poetic tradition. Course credit exclusions: None. PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AS/EN 3320 6.00.

AP/EN 4332 3.00 Edgar Allan Poe
Applying various critical approaches, the course examines Poe's tales of horror, his detective fiction, his one novel, his lyric poetry, and his critical theories about the short story and poetry. Course credit exclusions: None. PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/EN 4219 3.00.

After 1900

AP/EN 3323 3.00 American Literature: 21st Century
This course explores American literature in the twenty-first century. The course will emphasize emerging literary voices of the new millennium but will also consider how writers who established themselves in the twentieth century adapt to, and write about, the changing cultural conditions of the new century. Course credit exclusions: None.

AP/EN 4191 3.00 Studies in the Literature of the United States: Contemporary Women Writers
A study of the postmodern "hybrid aesthetic" created by recent women writers. Our investigations include how genre is formed by gender; racial, cultural, class and generational issues and how contemporary American novels render home, community and women's self-realization. Course credit exclusion: AP/EN 4191 6.00. PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AS/EN 4210C 3.00 (prior to Fall/Winter 2003-2004), AS/EN 4217 3.00.

AP/EN 4352 3.00 F. Scott Fitzgerald
This course studies novels, selected short stories and essays by F. Scott Fitzgerald. Some of the notebook entries, letters, juvenilia and memoirs relating to his theories of writing and his own fiction in particular are considered. Course credit exclusions: None. PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AS/EN 4260J 3.00 (prior to Fall/Winter 2003-2004), AS/EN 4267 3.00.

AP/EN 4371 3.00 Contemporary American Drama
This seminar will focus on a range of socially relevant and theatrically innovative plays written and performed in the U.S. since 1990. Prerequisites: For English Majors/Minors only; AP/EN 1001 3.00 (with a grade of C or higher) and AP/EN 1002 3.00 (with a grade of C or higher). Course credit exclusions: AP/EN 3370 3.00, AP/EN 4370 3.00 (prior to Fall 2012), AP/EN 4370 6.00 (prior to Fall 2012). Open to: Yr 04 English, ENPR, PRWR and CRWR majors/ minors.

AP/EN 4384 3.00 20th Century American Humor
This course looks in depth at American humour in the 20th century. Writers surveyed may include H.L. Mencken, Will Rogers, Dorothy Parker, E.B. White, James Thurber, Frank Sullivan, Peter De Vries, Robert Benchley, Fran Lebowitz, Molly Ivins, Cynthia Heimel, David Sedaris, Woody Allen, and Regina Barreca. Prerequisites: For English Majors/Minors only; AP/EN 1001 3.00 (with a grade of C or higher) and AP/EN 1002 3.00 (with a grade of C or higher). Course credit exclusions: None. Open to: Yr 04 English, ENPR, PRWR and CRWR majors/ minors.

AP/EN 4390 6.00 Contemporary American Gothic
This course considers the ubiquity of the ghostly, the resonances of a haunted past, in recent American literature. It examines psychoanalytic, deconstructive, and social theories of gothic and considers persistences of traditional gothic motifs. Course credit exclusions: None. PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/EN 4218 6.00.

2. History, political science, sociology, communications, or social science

Before 1900

AP/HIST 1080 6.00 Growing Up in North America
This course examines what it meant to be young in different times and places in the United States and Canada, and explores the interplay of cultural and material circumstances that shaped ideas about childhood and children's actual lives. Course credit exclusions: None. PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/HIST 1080 6.00.

AP/HIST 1083 6.00 Mass Media and Popular Culture in the Americas, 1820-1980
This course introduces the historical study of culture and culture industries in the Americas since 1820, analyzing how cultural change both created and was created by transformations in politics, economics, and societies. Course credit exclusions: None. Prior TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/HIST 1083 6.00.

AP/HIST 2600 6.00 United States History
An overview of the United States from pre-colonization to the present. First term examines Native/European encounters, American Revolution, slavery, westward expansion, and Civil War. Second term traces the rise of the U.S. as an economic and military superpower, and the struggle for civil rights. Themes include race, immigration, religion, federal power, gender and the impact of social movements. Course credit exclusion: GL/HIST 2570 6.00. PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AK/HIST 2310 6.00, AS/HIST 2600 6.00, GL/HIST 2570 6.00.

AP/HIST 3622 3.00 The U.S. Civil War in American History and Public Memory
This course, which focuses on the years from 1840 to 1877, explores the causes of the U.S. Civil War, military strategy, and the aftermath of this conflict. Topics examined include slavery, politics, military history and the era of Reconstruction. Course credit exclusion: AP/HIST 3622 3.00 (prior to Fall 2014). Prior TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/HIST 3622 3.00.

AP/HIST 3691 3.00 America's Cold War
This course analyzes the Cold War as a clash of ideologies and "empires" and explores its impact on US foreign policy and on the political, economic, social, and cultural life of the United States. Course credit exclusions: None.

AP/HIST 3692 6.00 The United States in the World
This course examines the far-reaching impact the US has had on other nations as well as the ways that interactions with other nations have changed American society and culture since Independence, especially in the 20th century. Course credit exclusions: None. PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/HIST 3692 6.00.

AP/HIST 4055 3.00 God/U.S.A.: Religion in America Since 1491
This course explores the key themes, critical questions, and entrenched conflicts about the place of religion during the long and varied history of American civic and cultural life. It analyzes Native-Newcomer religious tensions, disestablishment, uniquely American religions, and the intersections of religion with war, nationalism, immigration, race, science, expansion, urbanization, gender, counterculture, and new media. Notes: This course is restricted to History and Religious Studies Honours majors and minors who have successfully completed at least 84 credits.

AP/HIST 4065 6.00 Indigenous Histories: Culture, Genocide, and Survival in the American West
U.S. Indigenous peoples share fascinating stories of cultural survival despite histories of violence and genocide. This course explores recent historiographical debates in the field of U.S. Indigenous history with special focus on the American West. It situates Indigenous peoples within the broader context of U.S. cultural, social, and political history. It also analyzes ethnohistorical methodologies and research ethics. Open to: History and Multicultural and Indigenous Studies Majors and Minors Note: This course is restricted to History and Multicultural and Indigenous Studies Honours majors and minors who have successfully completed at least 84 credits. Prerequisites: AP/MIST 1050 6.00 or AP/HIST 2600 6.00 or AP/HIST 3601 6.00 or AP/HIST 3602 6.00 or AP/HIST 3610 6.00 or AP/HIST 3622 3.00 or AP/HIST 3625 3.00 or AP/HIST 3645 3.00 or AP/HIST 3692 6.00 or AP/HUMA 2325 6.00 or AP/MIST/CDNS/HUMA 3538 6.00 or departmental permission. Course credit exclusions: None

AP/POLS 3540 3.00 American Government and Politics
An analysis of the American system via examination of recent political events. Attention is given to the composition of the socio-political elite, the nature of mass influence in public policies, and the operation of such major institutions as the congress, courts, presidency and political parties. Course credit exclusion: GL/POLS 3230 6.00. PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AS/POLS 3540 3.00, GL/POLS 3230 6.00.

AP/POLS 4270 3.00 United States Foreign Policy
An examination of the historical development of the objectives of US foreign policy and of current policy issues. The course considers different analytic approaches to understanding the formulation and implementation of policy with emphasis on bureaucratic politics. Course credit exclusion: None. PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AK/POLS/PPAS 4115 3.00 (prior to 2006), AS/POLS 4270 3.00.

AP/POLS 4470 3.00 Working Class Politics in Capitalist Democracies
This course seeks to understand the current parameters of working class politics through a theoretical and historical examination of the relationship between parties, trade unions and the democratic capitalist state. Course credit exclusions: None. PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/POLS 4470 3.00.

AP/POLS 4545 3.00 Approaches to American Politics
This seminar introduces participants to overarching interpretations of American politics. We critically examine different theories on the nature and driving forces of politics in the United States since the creation of the republic. Course credit exclusions: None. PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/POLS 4545 3.00.

AP/POLS 4546 3.00 Politics, Society and Democracy in the United States
This seminar explores the disjunction between US democratic ideals and practices within their political-economic context. Social, economic and ethnic inequalities are scrutinized in light of the strong symbolism provided by the US constitution and democratic institutions. Course credit exclusions: None. PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AS/POLS 4001D 3.00 (prior to Fall/Winter 2003-2004), AS/POLS 4546 3.00.

GL/HIST 2651 6.00 The History of the United States from the Colonial Foundations to the Present
The course provides a general survey of American history from the beginning to recent times. While devoting some attention to all aspects of the history of the United States, the course emphasizes especially the social, political, cultural and economic developments. Course credit exclusion: AP/HIST 2310 6.00 and GL/HIST 2570 6.00. (Crosslisted to: GL/SOSC 2651 6.00)

GL/HIST 3622 6.00 The Americas and Asia: Contact and Conflict in the Transpacific World
This course examines North America's past with a focus on its relations with Asia and the Pacific. It studies links, connections and tensions as people, capital, products, power and ideas travelled between Asia and the Pacific Coast of the Americas. (Crosslisted to: GL/ILST 3622 6.00)

GL/POLS 3230 6.00 Government and Politics of the United States
An examination of contemporary American public life. Special attention is given to the presidency, the legislative process, federalism, the protection of individual liberties and the evolution of foreign and domestic policy. Note: Open to first-year students.

After 1900

AP/COMN 3700 3.00 Advertising: The Growth of a Twentieth Belief System
This course reviews the historical development of advertising. Careful attention is placed on the economic shift from production to consumption; the culture of consumption and other contributing factors. Course credit exclusion: AP/COMN 3315 6.00 (prior to Fall 2012). PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/SOSC 3315 6.00. AP/COMN 3701 3.00 Advertising, Culture and Society This course examines the place of advertising within culture and society. It will focus on the analysis of advertising; the cultural triumph of the image; the democratization of luxury; the aesthetics of mass culture and the place of advertising within contemporary culture and society. Course credit exclusion: AP/COMN 3315 6.00 (prior to Fall 2012). PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/SOSC 3315 6.00.

AP/COMN 3750 3.00 Television as Communication
This course examines the role of television in representing and constructing shared beliefs. Consideration will be given to regulation, the medium itself and larger structures. Course credit exclusion: AP/COMN 3316 6.00 (prior to Fall 2012). PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/SOSC 3316 6.00.

AP/COMN 3751 3.00 Television as Culture
This course examines the interaction between television and culture by exploring the local and global impact of television, its structures, the medium and its effects. The place of television within the larger structure of society and culture will be examined. Audience response and other variables will be considered. Course credit exclusions: AP/COMN 3316 6.00 (prior to Fall 2012). PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/SOSC 3316 6.00.

AP/HIST 3692 6.00 The United States in the World
This course examines the far-reaching impact the US has had on other nations as well as the ways that interactions with other nations have changed American society and culture since Independence, especially in the 20th century. Course credit exclusions: None. PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/HIST 3692 6.00.

AP/POLS 3540 3.00 American Government and Politics
An analysis of the American system via examination of recent political events. Attention is given to the composition of the socio-political elite, the nature of mass influence in public policies, and the operation of such major institutions as the congress, courts, presidency and political parties. Course credit exclusion: GL/POLS 3230 6.00. PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AS/POLS 3540 3.00, GL/POLS 3230 6.00.

AP/POLS 4270 3.00 United States Foreign Policy
An examination of the historical development of the objectives of US foreign policy and of current policy issues. The course considers different analytic approaches to understanding the formulation and implementation of policy with emphasis on bureaucratic politics. Course credit exclusion: None. PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AK/POLS/PPAS 4115 3.00 (prior to 2006), AS/POLS 4270 3.00.

AP/POLS 4470 3.00 Working Class Politics in Capitalist Democracies
This course seeks to understand the current parameters of working class politics through a theoretical and historical examination of the relationship between parties, trade unions and the democratic capitalist state. Course credit exclusions: None. PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/POLS 4470 3.00. AP/POLS 4545 3.00 Approaches to American Politics This seminar introduces participants to overarching interpretations of American politics. We critically examine different theories on the nature and driving forces of politics in the United States since the creation of the republic. Course credit exclusions: None. PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/POLS 4545 3.00.

AP/POLS 4546 3.00 Politics, Society and Democracy in the United States
This seminar explores the disjunction between US democratic ideals and practices within their political-economic context. Social, economic and ethnic inequalities are scrutinized in light of the strong symbolism provided by the US constitution and democratic institutions. Course credit exclusions: None. PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AS/POLS 4001D 3.00 (prior to Fall/Winter 2003-2004), AS/POLS 4546 3.00.

AP/SOCI 4440 6.00 Racialization and the Law
This course critically examines the relationship between law and social inequality, treating law and justice as contradictory. The focus is on the place of law in forming radicalized groups, but also deals with gender, sexual orientation, class and age stratification. Prerequisite: Students must have successfully completed 84 credits. Course credit exclusion: AP/SOCI 4440 6.00 (prior to Fall 2013). PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/SOCI 4440 6.00.

AP/SOSC 3240 3.00 Labor and Globalization I: North American Perspectives
This course looks at the post-war assumptions governing the limits and possibilities of trade union action in mature welfare states. It moves to looking at labour in English Canada and Quebec, the US and Mexico, pre and during NAFTA. Course credit exclusions: None. PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/SOSC 3240 3.00.

3. Humanities, music, dance, film, art

Before 1900

AP/CLTR 3610 6.00 Popular Expression in North American Music
A survey of North American musical idioms from their Indigenous, European and African antecedents to the present. Selected styles and creators are situated within their immediate contexts of commerce, identity, and aesthetic norms. Note: AP/CLTR 3610 3.00 (AK/CLTR 3610 3.00 prior to Fall 2009) and first half of AP/CLTR 3610 6.00 (AK/CLTR 3610 6.00 prior Fall 2009) conclude at 1950. Course credit exclusion: AP/CLTR 3610 3.00. PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AK/CLTR 3610 3.00, AK/CLTR 3610 6.00. (Crosslisted to: AP/HUMA 3903 6.00)

AP/HUMA 1300 9.00 The Cultures of Resistance in the Americas: The African American Experience
This course examines oppression and the ways in which Afro-American, Amerindian and racially-mixed communities in the Caribbean, Latin America, Canada and the United States use cultural patterns - the oral tradition, religion and ethics - both to comment on that oppression and to express alternatives. Note:This is an approved LA&PS General Education course: Humanities PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/HUMA 1300 9.00.

AP/HUMA 2320 9.00 Ideas of America: The Cultures of North America
This course addresses cultural developments and transformations in North America from the period of European contact to the present. Following a comparative investigation of imperialism and nationalism in shaping the cultures of Canada, the United States and Mexico, the course offers a close examination of North America in the 20th century devoting particular attention to the realm of popular culture. Note: This course has been approved in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies for general education credit. Course credit exclusions: None. PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/HUMA 2320 9.00.

AP/HUMA 3538 6.00 Comparative Issues in Canadian and American Native Literature
Examines similarities and contrasts in contemporary Native writers in Canada and the United States. The course explores many varied interpretations of Native historical experience, definitions of culture, "self-determination" and the meaning and implications of "Indian" identities. Course credit exclusions: AP/EN 3305 3.00, AP/REI 3538 6.00 (prior to Fall 2013). PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AK/EN 3000J 6.00 (prior to Summer 1997), AK/EN 3858 6.00, AK/HUMA 3605M 6.00 (prior to Fall/Winter 2000-2001). (Crosslisted to: AP/MIST 3538 6.00, AP/CDNS 3538 6.00)
GS/MUSI 5190 3.00 African-American Traditional Music
Course description TBA.

After 1900

AP/CH 3810 3.00 Chinese-American Diasporic Literature
The course studies Chinese-American literature from its origins in the mid-nineteenth century to recent times, focusing on fiction and biography. It examines its literary developments, as well as its representative writers and works. Both literary characteristics and socio-historical values of some representative works will be explored in the course. Course credit exclusions: None.

AP/HUMA 3903 6.00 Popular Expression in North American Music
A survey of North American musical idioms from their Indigenous, European and African antecedents to the present. Selected styles and creators are situated within their immediate contexts of commerce, identity, and aesthetic norms. Note: AP/CLTR 3610 3.00 (AK/CLTR 3610 3.00 prior to Fall 2009) and first half of AP/CLTR 3610 6.00 (AK/CLTR 3610 6.00 prior Fall 2009) conclude at 1950. Course credit exclusion: AP/CLTR 3610 3.00. PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AK/CLTR 3610 3.00, AK/CLTR 3610 6.00. (Crosslisted to: AP/CLTR 3610 6.00)

FA/FILM 1701 3.00 Hollywood: Old and New
Offers a fully online introductory course that provides Web-based delivery of lectures, discussion groups and screenings. Key concepts in critical film analysis will be introduced and important themes in American film history will be examined.
FA/FILM 3420A 3.00 Studies in Genre: The Rise and Fall of the Hollywood Musical
Examines and celebrates of the American film musical as a unique genre, emphasizing its multi-disciplinary elements, analyzing its development, structure and meaning and considering the various factors - technological, industrial, political and cultural - and the key creative figures that played important roles in its growth and demise. Prerequisite: FA/FILM 1400 6.00 or FA/FILM 2401 6.00 or permission of the Film Department.

FA/FILM 3420E 3.00 Studies in Genre: The Science Fiction Film
Surveys science fiction films to 1965, the course explores the place of science fiction film in the overall development of cinema as well as the theoretical and ideological issues arising from the films themselves. Prerequisites: None.

FA/MUSI 3350 3.00 Music of the Americas
Studies the various musical traditions that have been absorbed and transformed by the emerging civilizations of the New World. Topics include: the history of music in British North America; the blending of African, European and native idioms in Latin America and the Caribbean; the rise and development of jazz, blues and urban popular music including rock; the music and musical culture of minority groups; New World musics in their cultural context. Prerequisites: Foundation courses. Course credit exclusion: the former FA/MUSI 2350 6.00, FA/MUSI 3350 6.00

FA/MUSI 3510 3.00 African-American Popular Music
This course surveys the history of African-American popular music from World War II to the 1980s, considering R&B through music analysis and critical readings. Issues include roots in pre-WWII era; social/political contexts; impact of the music industry, technology and mass media. Prerequisites: FA/MUSI 1000 6.0, FA/MUSI 1200 9.0, FA/MUSI 2201 3.0, FA/MUSI 2202 3.0 and FA/MUSI 2200 6.0